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phosmag - VOLODJA PLAYING KATYUSHA by Andrea Boscardin and Arianna Sanesi -

On August 2012 I was in Ukraine together with the photographer Arianna Sanesi. During our journey through eastern Europe, from the Baltic Sea to the Black Sea, we decided to have a stop in Ukraine, visiting some friends. I don’t know exactly the name of the place and I can barely locate it on a map, but I remember that it was far about one-hour from Khmelnitsky. Anyway, after a long trip we finally arrived at destination: a place that we already knew because Arianna was there just two years before doing her project “Lu”.

So for the second time we were in this beautiful house in the Ukrainian countryside! After a big lunch and some homemade vodka our guest Volodja showed up with his old accordion and started to play the song Katyusha.

© Andrea Boscardin and Arianna Senesi, box set including 2 books + 1 framed picture collected in a handmade lace soft case, totally handmade, Rumore Nero

© Andrea Boscardin and Arianna Sanesi, box set including 2 books + 1 framed picture collected in a handmade lace soft case, totally handmade, Rumore Nero

In a few moments the house was full of notes and of a deep sense of nostalgia. What we found interesting was that Katyusha was a famous Russian song, and that the homesickness was probably due for the distance from the “old mother Russia”.

© Andrea Boscardin and Arianna Senesi, box set including 2 books + 1 framed picture collected in a handmade lace soft case, totally handmade, Rumore Nero

© Andrea Boscardin and Arianna Sanesi, box set including 2 books + 1 framed picture collected in a handmade lace soft case, totally handmade, Rumore Nero

Once back in Italy we decided to make two little handmade books: our goal was trying to transmit the feel of that situation from the point of view of two different photographers. We also made a little box who gathers the two books together plus a framed picture in a handmade lace bag.

 Moving the lace (like a curtain in a window) and opening the book (like a door) is like helping the reader entering the house and being invited inside this intimate Ukrainian interior, sitting on a sofa and listening at the music.”

More info:

www.andreaboscardin.com

www.ariannasanesi.com

www.rumorenero.tumblr.com

Please note: all images and texts are protected by Copyright and belong to the Artist.